About Max Weber Stiftung

The Max Weber Foundation promotes global research, focused on the areas of social sciences, cultural studies and the humanities. Our research is conducted at ten institutes in various countries across the globe with different and independent fields of focus. Through our globally operating institutes, we are able to contribute to the communication and networking between Germany and our host countries or regions. By promoting academic dialogue and merging academic and non-academic employees from several countries with different cultural backgrounds, the Max Weber Foundation is able to strengthen the internationalization of research.

Frank Walter Steinmeier zu Besuch am OIB

Außenminister Frank Walter Steinmeier und Stefan Leder, Direktor des Orient-Instituts Beirut

Außenminister Frank Walter Steinmeier und Stefan Leder, Direktor des Orient-Instituts Beirut

Der deutsche Außenminister Frank-Walter Steinmeier und Mitglieder seiner Delegation sprachen am 30. Mai 2014 im Orient-Institut Beirut mit libanesischen Gästen über die desolate Lage in Syrien und ihre Auswirkungen auf den Libanon. Der Libanon war das erste Ziel auf Steinmeiers Reise durch Nahen Osten, die er am vergangenen Freitag antrat.

Die libanesischen Gesprächsteilnehmer machten sehr deutlich, dass konfessionelle Polarisierung, Gewalt und Angst das Zusammenleben zwischen Christen und Muslimen erschweren und gefährden würden. Christen sähen aber weiterhin ihre Heimat und Zukunft in der Region. Dass die religiöse und kulturelle Vielfalt im arabischen Osten dringend erhalten werden müsse, darüber waren sich alle Seiten einig. Die Zivilgesellschaft vor Ort und die internationale Gemeinschaft könnten gemeinsam dafür eintreten. Von libanesischer Seite hieß es, auf ein Einlenken der Konfliktparteien in Syrien könne man nicht hoffen, solange das Geschehen durch einen komplizierten Stellvertreterkrieg bestimmt sei. Für diesen müsse zunächst eine politische Lösung mit den in Syrien kriegführenden Staaten gefunden werden. Um politische Veränderungen anzustoßen, seien zivilgesellschaftliche Initiativen und Entwicklungen wichtig, die im Libanon, unter Beteiligung der geflohenen Syrer und vereinzelt weiterhin auch in Syrien selbst auf Verständigung hinarbeiten müssten.

Max Weber Stiftung

The Max Weber Foundation promotes global research, focused on the areas of social sciences, cultural studies and the humanities. Our research is conducted at ten institutes in various countries across the globe with different and independent fields of focus. Through our globally operating institutes, we are able to contribute to the communication and networking between Germany and our host countries or regions. By promoting academic dialogue and merging academic and non-academic employees from several countries with different cultural backgrounds, the Max Weber Foundation is able to strengthen the internationalization of research.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookGoogle Plus

Inverted Worlds: Cultural Motion in the Arab Region, Eds. Syrinx von Hees, Nadia von Maltzahn, Ines Weinrich (Orient Institute Studies, 2)

Introduction

By Syrinx von Hees, Nadia von Maltzahn, Ines Weinrich

<1>

The wave of popular uprisings taking place in several countries in the Arab region since early 2011 launched a socio-political transformation process that is ongoing. While each country in the region is living a very different experience of what has come to be known as the Arab spring, most countries share the fact that diverse social players are asking themselves anew about their role in society. Established worlds have been inverted by reversing deep-seated orders and bringing new players to the fore, players whose voices existed but were often not heard and rarely appeared en masse before 2011. In these inverted worlds, the metaphor of inversion also relates to the momentum carrying cultural change in the region, in which for instance street murals become “not only ‘memorial spaces’ for remembering the dead and the injured, but they also become spaces of visual narratives with unfolding plots between the enemies and the defenders of the revolution” as Mona Abaza argues in her contribution to this volume. The revolutionary momentum in the region has invigorated various forms of expressing protest, be it through rap, graffiti and street murals, new media and video, or by using humour and non-linearity in visual and narrative forms.

<2>

This volume deals with arenas and manifestations of cultural motion in relation to revolution and transformation processes. The political vagueness of popular unrest and of its various backgrounds, as well as the complexity of the ensuing political itineraries, encourage inquiry into the broad cultural resonances and diverse expressions which feed the aspirations for change and inspire resistance. Inverted Worlds: Cultural Motion in the Arab Region thus considers both regional and cross-cultural aspects of recent events in the Arab world, and relates back to dynamics at hand prior to the uprisings. Cultural Motion here signifies the move of people and ideas towards a revision of power structures, social setups and cultural configurations, both on the home stage and in the international arena. The Arab drama of renewal and the movement towards diversified and globalized cultural orientations are closely interrelated.

<3>

The contributions in this volume are the documentation of a congress the Orient-Institut Beirut (OIB) organised in light of the above in Beirut in October 2012. The articles represent three of the four main themes of the congress, namely the position of music as a vehicle for political, social and cultural ideas (conceived by Stefan Knost), the role of humour in coping with political, social and cultural oppression in the Arab world (conceived by Thomas Scheffler and Monika Halkort), and debates about the use of non-linear narratives in relation to current revolutions (conceived by Syrinx von Hees and Ines Weinrich).

Popular music and its role in political and social transformation
<4>

Music can be a vehicle for political, social and cultural ideas using critical, polemical or subversive lyrics. Messages circulate more or less freely, especially today through the use of the Internet. Recent and not so recent popular songs have been inspired by Arab nationalist ideology or the Palestinian struggle for liberation. At the dawn of the Arab uprisings, the dream of the Arab nation seemed to have vanished. What have artists of the young generation set out to fight for? How do they reflect upon their own role regarding social transformations and the impact of their songs? What positions do they take vis-à-vis the moral standards and politics of the twenty-first century? Outside the focus of mass media, young singers display their independence. They use social networks and free Internet platforms to broadcast themselves.

<5>

Not long ago, musical refrains were developed on the fringe of society. Today, they piggyback on their audience, and street singers strike up popular songs or those that have become popular in the demonstrations. Whether amateurs or professionals, do the singers represent the voice of the opposition? Does the writing of new songs or simply new lyrics for the refrains of folk songs play an active part in the current uprisings? Who are the authors and under what conditions are the songs developed? The “air” of rebellion has spread throughout the Arab world, each country and region with its own political, confessional and ethnic particularities. What are the themes recurrent in the revolutionary songs, and what insights into social dynamics do they reveal?

<6>

Yves Gonzalez-Quijano debates the question of modernity in cultural production in “Rap, an Art of the Revolution or a Revolution in Art”. He questions the recurrent notion that “rap is the voice of the Arab revolution” and criticizes France and other Western countries for simplifying a scene that is much more complex in its social, political and ideological reality, reflecting only their political agendas while ignoring local realities. He also discusses in which sense rap can be described as a new form of cultural production.

<7>

Ines Dallaji in “Tunisian Rap Music and the Arab Spring: Revolutionary Anthems and Post-Revolutionary Tendencies” focuses in particular on two rappers during and after the revolution and argues that rap music served as a medium strengthening the awareness for the causes of the outbreak. People could not only relate to critical lyrics, but singular singers provided the Tunisian revolution with a face. However, she reminds that music reflects social realities rather than driving them.

<8>

In “The Voice of Freedom”, Stephan Procházka on the contrary attributes a more active role to music during the Egyptian revolution. Selecting songs from the Internet including different genres like pop, folksongs, rap and hip-hop and analysing their language, he shows that the themes of freedom, rights, Egypt, dignity and honour appear frequently, often juxtaposing a bright future with a dark past, but rarely mentioning Mubarak or other opponents by name.

<9>

Simon Dubois in “Street Songs from the Syrian Protests” analyses four protest songs chanted by adult singers during demonstrations in interaction with the audience between October 2011 and March 2012, in which the direct call for Bashar [al-Asad] to leave and insults against him like “donkey”, “butcher”, “murderer”, “killer”, “liar”, “screw you” are pronounced. External enemies, namely the United States and Israel, are also mentioned in the songs, protesters using the same arguments as the government.

Humour, Suffering and Resistance
<10>

Humour, a multifaceted and ubiquitous phenomenon, may serve different and sometimes contradictory functions in dealing with authorities and norms. Depending on the particular political situation, jokes, sarcasm, irony, and other witticisms may serve as a “security valve” of authoritarian regimes by helping the oppressed to “let off steam” without changing the situation that makes them suffer. On the other hand, humour may also serve as a tool of resistance by publicly defying authoritarian rule through ridicule and laughter.

<11>

Humour is articulated through various types of media (such as Internet, TV, radio, personal communication), various genres (such as jokes, mocking, comedy, cartoons, satire, graffiti), by many types of actors (from spontaneous individuals to professional humourists), and in various interpersonal situations, ranging from intimate conversation to mass riots. Part of intentional acts as well as of comical situations, humour may convey its subversive potential by breaking the “rules of the game”, suspending established norms of self-conduct and exposing the contingency of power by confronting it with its own rhetoric and performative grammar, even if only temporarily.

<12>

Nader Srage focuses in his linguistic study “The Protest Discourse” on “The example of ‘Irhal’ (Go/Get Out/Leave)” being one of the key terms of the Arab uprisings, crossing boundaries. He shows how Egyptians have used great ingenuity in using “Irhal” and alternative expressions inspired by their daily lives, appropriating available local references to shape their rhetoric.

<13>

Sara Binay in her article “Where are they going?” considers jokes as one kind of narrative that can be used to express disobedience and subversion. Drawing parallels between Syria, Lebanon and the former Soviet Union and German Democratic Republic, she argues that while jokes may not change realities, they can express a desire for change. Jokes are good indicators of social and political change, since through their informal nature they reveal dynamics at play within a society.

<14>

Mona Abaza in “Satire, Laughter and Mourning in Cairo’s Graffiti” explores the role of street art in revolutionary Egypt, focusing on the fact that humour and satire remain one of the dominant features of resistance. Her account, rich in images, is also an attempt to chronicle the walls, constantly painted over and whitened by the authorities. While perceived as an underworld clandestine art, graffiti is an ideal medium to spread dissenting ideas anonymously. Abaza provides an insight into the appropriation of public spaces as spaces of contestation by younger artists.

Linear and non-linear narratives in the context of Arab revolutions
<15>

It can be argued that Tweets, Facebook status updates, Blackberry messages, and other html related material were a major catalyst in the recent uprisings. Digitalization in its multifaceted dimensions can be regarded as one of the pre-conditions of these societal motions. In his essay “Deep Remixability” Lev Manovich describes software as species within the common ecology. Once released software, like species, start interacting, mutating, and making hybrids. To explain, he uses the example of the designer who, by the end of the 1990s, was able to combine operations and representational formats such as a bitmapped still image, an image sequence, a vector drawing, a 3D model and digital video specific to these programmes within the same design – regardless of its destination media. He finally compares the production of software to the Czechoslovakian Velvet Revolution, where a whole system was uprooted in an almost invisible pace. At this point in the Arab world, we are witnessing the change that is a recipient of this deep remixability.

<16>

In the digital era, narrative has lost its body to become volatile and viral, making its way to fluid transitions between different states of materiality. Narrative is manifested through information spaces that allow random access; the sequential is no longer a must. The elements of the linear narratives (script, scenario, scene, and the like) are now highlighted, tagged, mapped, annotated, thus accompanying the narrative to its deciphered realm. A narrative is today searchable, browsable, and mutable in most cases. On another note, narrative owes its current form to the inherited strictly linear form. The polemic in the narrative is derived from its swinging between the strictly linear that embeds a hierarchical structure and the non-linear’s seemingly infinite possibilities to reproduce and reconfigure the information contained in these aforementioned structures.

<17>

Lev Manovich, who presented his work at the congress, raises the question of how to take advantage of the gigantic amount of digital culture that is surrounding us. For about twenty years, institutions have been digitizing films, television shows, videos, newspapers and more. The narrative of history has become available to us as databases. In 2005, social media enlarged the source of digital information even more; tracking history has become easier, at least theoretically speaking. Manovich’s initiative in his lab of software studies tried to develop tools that allow us to look at large image collections – with often surprising results. His software studies initiatives and articles are available online (http://lab.softwarestudies.com/ and http://www.manovich.net/).

<18>

Marwan Kraidy in his article “A Heterotopology of Graffiti: A Preliminary Exploration” approaches graffiti in Beirut from a theoretical angle, convincingly applying Foucault’s concept of “heterotopia”, or other space, to graffiti’s status in the Lebanese media system. Focusing on graffiti reflecting media, he explores the latter’s place in relationship to other media and its place in the media ecosystem in Lebanon and the Arab world. Kraidy highlights the intertextual and dialogical nature of graffiti.

<19>

The sound artist Matthias Kispert has created a collage of sounds recorded at different protests in London between 2001 and 2012. This way he gives audible evidence how riot sound effects may not create protests in the first place, but can amplify and motivate people in a tense situation finally provoking an actual riot.

<20>

Hassan Choubassi in his contribution “The Arab Masses: From the Implosion of Fantasies to the Explosion of the Political” argues that the use of mobile social media in Syria made it possible for the private/virtual/free/anonymous and public/real/restricted spheres to become more and more interrelated, creating an augmented reality – with reference to Jean Baudrillard and Lev Manovich – that finally led to street protest and personalized open criticism.

<21>

In her contribution “Counting versus Narration – On the Database as Political Form”, Monika Halkort reconsiders the relationship between database and information taking into consideration their openness and infinite variability. Starting from the experience of a grassroots initiative during the process of reconstructing the Palestinian refugee camp Nahr el Bared after its destruction in 2007, she argues that the database can be used as a technology of resistance rather than a technology that imposes taxonomies in order to govern the other.

<22>

Lotte Laub focuses on two video works by two Lebanese artists that were produced as immediate artistic reactions to the ongoing conflict in Syria and to the 2006 war in Lebanon respectively. She analyses their replacement of linear structures with circular ones, comparing them to a rhizome, a conception of knowledge that works against linear connections. She shows that collapse and recovery occur simultaneously, expanding indefinitely. Regarding the lyrical dimension of the video works she argues that narration is focused on the level of mediality itself. Finally she develops the idea that these art works need to be interpreted as a performative attempt to emphasize the human aspect.

<23>

The journalist and novelist Sahar Mandour analyses the stories and their inherent narratives of a range of different Egyptian newspapers belonging to the ‘national’ and to the ‘independent’ press as they appeared on January 25, 2011. She explores the interrelatedness of all narration lines, grasping the overall picture through newspapers’ yesterday’s stories, arguing that the revolution was the intersection of a multitude of factors and contexts.

<24>

Taking advantage of the digital age, Inverted Worlds: Cultural Motion in the Arab Region incorporates an array of audio-visual material in its contributions, ranging from YouTube clips to sound-files to still images. This raises issues of longevity, however. While images and sound-files will be accessible to readers in years to come, the user-content-generated nature of YouTube does not allow for any predictability, since any content-provider may decide to withdraw his contribution at any time. Therefore YouTube files are incorporated into the text to add an audio-visual dimension to the reader as long as the files exist, while ensuring that the authors’ arguments are still valid without access to the files.

<25>

To conclude, let us turn to the Lebanese writer and intellectual Elias Khoury who opened Inverted Worlds: Congress on Cultural Motion with the following remarks: “The revolutions are still in the midst of formation, in the midst of a change which is very complicated and which obliges people like me to be humble. What is happening in the Arab world makes intellectuals like me, who have struggled all their lives for democracy, freedom and social justice, feel like we really were surprised by what happened. We must go back to the school of history, and to learn history from the young people who occupy the streets of the Arab world.” (The full keynote address is accessible here: http://vimeo.com/57689837). This volume attempts to capture some of the narratives of cultural motion in the Arab region at a time of change and inverted worlds. Due to the nature of events, many of the contributions are work in progress and invite further inquiry into the subject matters at hand.

 

http://www.perspectivia.net/content/publikationen/orient-institut-studies/2-2013

 

Table of contents

Syrinx von Hees, Nadia von Maltzahn and Ines Weinrich: Introduction

Yves Gonzalez-Quijano: Rap, an Art of Revolution or a Revolution in Art?

Ines Dallaji: Tunisian Rap Music and the Arab Spring: Revolutionary Anthems and Post-Revolutionary Tendencies

Stephan Procházka: The Voice of Freedom: Remarks on the Language of Songs from the Egyptian Revolution 2011

Simon Dubois: Street Songs from the Syrian Protests

Nader Srage: The Protest Discourse: The Example of “Irhal” (Go/Get Out/Leave)

Sara Binay: “Where are they going?” – Jokes as Indicators of Social and Political Change

Mona Abaza: Satire, Laughter and Mourning in Cairo’s Graffiti

Marwan Kraidy: A Heterotopology of Graffiti: A Preliminary Exploration

Matthias Kispert: The Sound of Discontent

Hassan Choubassi: The Arab Masses: From the Implosion of Fantasies to the Explosion of the Political

Monika Halkort: Counting versus Narration – On the Database as Political Form

Lotte Laub: Circularity versus Linearity: Immediate Artistic Reactions to Periods of War and Political Upheaval

Sahar Mandour: قصة الأمس | Yesterday’s Story

Max Weber Stiftung

The Max Weber Foundation promotes global research, focused on the areas of social sciences, cultural studies and the humanities. Our research is conducted at ten institutes in various countries across the globe with different and independent fields of focus. Through our globally operating institutes, we are able to contribute to the communication and networking between Germany and our host countries or regions. By promoting academic dialogue and merging academic and non-academic employees from several countries with different cultural backgrounds, the Max Weber Foundation is able to strengthen the internationalization of research.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookGoogle Plus

CfP DiverCities: Contested Space and Urban Identities in Beirut, Cairo and Tehran

divercitiesFrom the 12th until the 14th of December 2013 the Orient-Institut Beirut and the Goethe-Institut Beirut will be hosting the international conference “DiverCities: Contested Space and Urban Identities in Beirut, Cairo and Tehran”. The conference aims to look at urban governance, its agents, agendas and options, through contested space and conflicting urban concepts, identity claims and social environments. Rapid urbanisation and demographic change, antagonistic political and economic interests, and the diversity of cultural patterns have impacted and continue to impact the make-up of local neighbourhoods and use of public space in urban centres. Situated at the core of social and political fractions, contested spaces reveal insights into the dynamics of diverse societies and urban identities. Contested space here is understood as the physical space at the centre of conflicting interests as defined by different social actors. The focus will be on the three cities of Beirut, Cairo and Tehran, each highlighting different types of fragmentations, political, cultural and social.

4594557875_308faf3437_b

Wall in Beirut
Picture: my inner voice, CC BY 2.0.

The focus will be on the three cities of Beirut, Cairo and Tehran, each highlighting different types of fragmentations, political, cultural and social. Beirut leaves one with the question of “Whose space is it”? Different social layers coexisting in close proximity to each other, in combination with competing economic interests over the already densely populated urban space, make the city host to many areas of contestation. This applies as much to supposed public spaces like the barely accessible al-­Horshal-­Snawbar as it does to places like Raouche where investors take little interest in cultural diversity. In Tehran cultural fragmentations impact on urban life, cultural here referring to norms, values and practices, what is considered right and wrong by different sections of society and the multi-­layered ruling establishment. In a place where public space is there and accessible but controlled by the morality police who often hold different values to the society, citizens take refuge in the private – impacting on the delineation of public and private space. Cairo has probably been hardest hit by demographic change, and has to constantly deal with the challenges rapid urban expansion brings with it. The question of formal versus informal space plays an important role in urban governance in a socially fragmented city. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each in terms of fostering social cohesion while ensuring diversity? How are contested spaces governed on a local level?

The aim of the conference is to gain insights into experiences of urban governance as it is perceived and practiced by different lobby groups and social agents in view of the ambivalence of public space in diverse societies. We invite academics and practitioners (urbanists, architects, civil society activists, anthropologists, political scientists etc.) to submit papers dealing with contested space and urban identities in Beirut, Cairo and Tehran addressing one of the following three panels:

Panel 1: Claims and Agency

Sociology of space in the twenty-first century is still informed by the basic Marxian insight that human beings ‘make’ their own history, but that they do so under ‘given’ circumstances not of their own choosing to which they may relate by means of using, controlling, circumventing, subverting, transforming, or eliminating them. Material, social, and ideational ‘structures’ both confine and empower human agency (Giddens). This is particularly visible in the complex interplay between human actors and their spatial and built environments. The dialectics of material and socially constructed spaces (Lefebvre, Löw) are at the core of Urban Studies. This panel will focus (a) on the legal, moral, economic, and political claims that conflicting urban actors in the three cities may advance to control ownership, access, and uses of urban spaces, and (b) on their opportunities, resources and strategies to realize or renegotiate these claims.

  • What are the factors fuelling antagonism between different claims over the use of urban space (needs and means, economic interests, cultural diversity)?
  • What are the power dynamics over contested spaces?
  • What are the legal frameworks, political constraints, options and loyalties of different actors (municipalities, civil society, political parties etc.) in governing contested spaces?
  • What modes of symbolic appropriation of urban space do we observe?

Panel 2: Between Public and Private
Despite its historical contingency, the concept of a public space remains a powerful utopia that is strongly connected to the idea of a political space and to individual citizenship. As empty signifier a dichotomy of public and private continues to be the frame of reference for politicians, urban planners, and city dwellers on every level – normative, conceptual, and empirical. Every concrete meaning and manifestation of this dichotomy has an immediate impact on the lived, built, and imagined city, which is necessarily contentious and a dystopia for many of the individuals affected. The particularities of these negotiations between state agents, corporations/private–‐ interest groups, and populations over the quality of urban spaces are at the core of this panel.

  • What does it mean for a city’s spatial texture when the private becomes public and the public becomes private?
  • How do moral norms (whether imposed by society or the state) affect the delineation of public and private space, and how do diverse concepts coexist or clash?
  • How do (changing) gender relations define public and private space and how are they formed by the structural design of urban space?
  • How do alternative public spaces influence cultural production and how do manners of cultural production alter space?
  • What influence does virtual public space have on real space?

Panel 3: Open Air Spaces of Gathering – Norms and Practices
Open air spaces, whether designed for leisure purposes or as busy city squares, prestigious urban focal points and the like, often serve as public meeting places that may acquire a more specific significance for the assertion of citizen rights and contesting political power. The recent conflict over Gezi Park in Istanbul may illustrate this, and the importance of People’s Park in California in the debate over public space and the conceptualisation of the latter by diverse members of society (Don Mitchell) is an often‐cited example. This panel will focus on case studies of urban governance by looking at public open air spaces of gathering such as Horsh Beirut, Sioufi Park, the Corniche or the Beirut Waterfront, al‐Azhar Park or one of the Mayadin in Cairo, and public parks such as Laleh Park or equivalents in Tehran, and the intricate interplay between them and the public sphere. The aim is to discuss to what extent the spaces are used the way they were designed, who determines their use and whether and how this use is culturally and politically contested. The direct comparison between three structurally similar spaces of gathering in the three cities is of particular interest in this panel?

  • What are the symbolic, normative and practical frameworks of collectively used open air spaces?
  • How and under what circumstance do spontaneous popular practices create public open air space or alter its character?
  • In how far is the use of open air space culturally and politically encoded and contested?
  • What are the public order policies applied to such spaces and who is responsible for them?

The deadline for submission of abstracts (300 words) addressing one of the above panels is 31 July 2013. Please send your abstract together with a short biographical statement to Nadia von Maltzahn (maltzahn@orient-institut.org). Successful applicants will be notified by late August 2013. The conference language is English.

Call for Papers as a PDF

Max Weber Stiftung

The Max Weber Foundation promotes global research, focused on the areas of social sciences, cultural studies and the humanities. Our research is conducted at ten institutes in various countries across the globe with different and independent fields of focus. Through our globally operating institutes, we are able to contribute to the communication and networking between Germany and our host countries or regions. By promoting academic dialogue and merging academic and non-academic employees from several countries with different cultural backgrounds, the Max Weber Foundation is able to strengthen the internationalization of research.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookGoogle Plus

Video Inverted Worlds: “Do You Like What is Happening?! The Country is Falling Down!”

“Do you like what is happening?! The country is falling down!” this is the most famous sentence you may hear while taking a taxi ride through streets of Cairo. Does this sentence really reflect a new feeling of boredom towards the revolution? Or there is a lack of communication with the revolutionary groups, activists and parties? The Egyptian revolution was famous for its extremely satirical slogans and chants, and before 25 January 2011, satirical journalism played an important role in destroying the “prestige” of the past regime.

Sorry for disturbance We build Egypt نأسف للازعاج فنحن نبني مصر
(Maggie Osama | CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

But how will humour play its role in the new political system with political Islam groups taking large portions of power and the military generals struggling for the benefits they used to gain from the past regime? At this point the Egyptian youth depends on humour as a weapon to face those in power on the one hand, and on the other hand as a new way of communication to deliver their messages to the people who are being misled by the deceptive governmental media tools. But will they be able to develop a common language with the ordinary people? Through this new social and political scene, “Tok Tok” magazine came out as the first Egyptian comics magazine targeting adults and discussing social and political topics in an Egyptian way. Although “comic strips” art is still new to the Egyptian society, the magazine has been well received to date.

“Do You Like What is Happening?! The Country is Falling Down!” from Orient Institut Beirut on Vimeo.

 

Mohamed Anwar, political cartoonist, graduated from the Faculty of Engineering – Cairo University Biomedical Engineering Department. During his academic study, he started to work as political cartoonist at “Elbadil” daily newspaper, then moved to work at “Almasry Alyoum” daily newspaper. Now he is senior cartoonist at “Rose-Elyoussef” daily newspaper.

Hicham Rahma graduated from the animation department of the High Cinema Institute in 2005, and has worked in the Egyptian renaissance publishing house as graphic designer and illustrator for children comics magazines and book publications ever since. He is one of the leading members of Tok Tok comic magazine in Egypt, and is currently also working as a cartoonist at Almasry Alyuom. Hicham participated in a number of art fairs and events, including the Sharja book fair (UAE), Fibda comics Festival (Algeria), and the Arab spring comics workshop in Tetouan (Morocco).

Max Weber Stiftung

The Max Weber Foundation promotes global research, focused on the areas of social sciences, cultural studies and the humanities. Our research is conducted at ten institutes in various countries across the globe with different and independent fields of focus. Through our globally operating institutes, we are able to contribute to the communication and networking between Germany and our host countries or regions. By promoting academic dialogue and merging academic and non-academic employees from several countries with different cultural backgrounds, the Max Weber Foundation is able to strengthen the internationalization of research.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookGoogle Plus

Video Inverted Worlds: The Masses: From the Implosion of Fantasies to the Explosion of the Political. From Actual to Virtual to Augmented

7029060335_23a24eabbbWith new technologies of smart phones and mobile tablets, the image has taken a new dimension. It is no longer a representation nor a simulation nor virtual substitution, but rather actual reality itself augmented by the digital parameters of mobile devices, a step further beyond the actual and the virtual into a superimposition of both. Living under severe political oppression, the Arab masses resorted to virtual reality where it is a safe haven to express themselves and their most extreme fantasies without any restriction.

Cyber societies sprout in an exponential way caused by biased and cruel regimes of dictatorships that forbids political change and public political expression. Arab political regimes exercised a heavy censorship on conventional media and enforced a single totalitarian political party that does not allow power devolution. With the advent of the Internet Arab masses imploded in the virtual to its extreme saturation until, eventually, they exploded in the actual through revolution. 7029060535_612d5b5397

Hassan Choubassi is a visual artist and researcher born in Beirut in 1970 who graduated from DasArts in Amsterdam in 2005, and from the Lebanese American University in Beirut 1996. He is pursuing a PhD in Communication Media at the European Graduate School and researching the Arab online media accountability and how “augmented reality” of new media technology is mobilized to negate a stagnated media that is abolishing political change. Choubassi is currently the coordinator of the Communication Arts department at the Lebanese International University (LIU). His works were exhibited in Lebanon, Egypt, Germany, the Netherlands, UK, Belgium, Spain, USA, Luxembourg, Denmark, and others.

The Masses: From the Implosion of Fantasies to the Explosion of the Political. From Actual to Virtual to Augmented from Orient Institut Beirut on Vimeo.

Pictures: Facebook in Tahrir square, Egypt. (Interact Egypt – Play Innovation | CC BY-NC-SA 2.0), Twitter in Tahrir square (Interact Egypt – Play Innovation | CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Max Weber Stiftung

The Max Weber Foundation promotes global research, focused on the areas of social sciences, cultural studies and the humanities. Our research is conducted at ten institutes in various countries across the globe with different and independent fields of focus. Through our globally operating institutes, we are able to contribute to the communication and networking between Germany and our host countries or regions. By promoting academic dialogue and merging academic and non-academic employees from several countries with different cultural backgrounds, the Max Weber Foundation is able to strengthen the internationalization of research.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookGoogle Plus

Workshop: “Political Communication, Public Sphere and Transition in Egypt”

The Orient Institut Beirut project entitled “Media Culture in Transformation” will be holding its first international workshop entitled “Political Communication, Public Sphere and Transition in Egypt” on the 8th of May 2013, at The German Science Center Cairo (DWZ), 11 Sh. Saleh Ayoub, Zamalek. The workshop is followed by a CTTC event. The workshop aims at creating networks between the Egyptian and international scientific community in media and political studies.The workshop is accompanied by simultaneous interpretation (English/Arabic).

The intensive one-day workshop is structured in four panels with highly esteemed international guests from  diverse academic institutions within Egypt and abroad. It strengthens networks between the Egyptian and international scientific community in media and political studies, thus adds to the interdisciplinary dialogue. Furthermore, the workshop enhances the visibility of the project in the academic scene.

Participating guests represent The Orient Institut Beirut, Cairo University, The American University in Cairo, Centre d’Études et de Documentation Économiques, Juridiques et Sociales CEDEJ, Sydney University, Art Academy, The British University in Egypt, Modern Science Academy, as well as German universities: University of Erfurt, University of Mannheim, University of Hildesheim, and the Institute for Media and Communication Policy, Berlin.

Continue reading

Max Weber Stiftung

The Max Weber Foundation promotes global research, focused on the areas of social sciences, cultural studies and the humanities. Our research is conducted at ten institutes in various countries across the globe with different and independent fields of focus. Through our globally operating institutes, we are able to contribute to the communication and networking between Germany and our host countries or regions. By promoting academic dialogue and merging academic and non-academic employees from several countries with different cultural backgrounds, the Max Weber Foundation is able to strengthen the internationalization of research.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookGoogle Plus